IRS Maintains Health FSA Contribution Limit for 2021, Adjusts Other Benefit Limits

On October 26, 2020, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released Revenue Procedure 2020-45, which maintains the health flexible spending account (FSA) salary reduction contribution limit from 2020, which is $2,750, for plan years beginning in 2021. Thus, for health FSAs with a carryover feature, the maximum carryover amount is $550 (20% of the $2,750 salary reduction limit) for plan years beginning or ending in 2021. The Revenue Procedure also contains the cost-of-living adjustments that apply to dollar limitations in certain sections of the Internal Revenue Code.

Qualified Commuter Parking and Mass Transit Pass Monthly Limit

For 2021, the monthly limits for qualified parking and mass transit are $270 each (which remain the same from 2020).

Adoption Assistance Tax Credit Increase

For 2021, the credit allowed for adoption of a child is $14,440 (up $100 from 2020). The credit begins to phase out for taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income in excess of $216,660 (up $2,140 from 2020) and is completely phased out for taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income of $256,660 or more (up $2,140 from 2020).

Qualified Small Employer Health Reimbursement Arrangement (QSEHRA) Increase

For 2021, reimbursements under a QSEHRA cannot exceed $5,300 (single) / $10,700 (family), an increase of $50 (single) / $100 (family) from 2020.

Reminder: 2021 HSA Contribution Limits and HDHP Deductible and Out-of-Pocket Limits

Earlier this year, the IRS announced the inflation adjusted amounts for HSAs and high deductible health plans (HDHPs).

 

  2021 (single/family) 2020 (single/family)
Annual HSA Contribution Limit $3,600 / $7,200 $3,550 / $7,100
Minimum Annual HDHP Deductible $1,400 / $2,800 $1,400 / $2,800
Maximum Out-of-Pocket for HDHP $7,000 / $14,000 $6,900 / $13,800

The ACA’s out-of-pocket limits for in-network essential health benefits have also increased for 2021.  Note that all non-grandfathered group […]

By |October 28th, 2020|Compliance, Employee Communications, Human Resources, IRS, Medical|Comments Off on IRS Maintains Health FSA Contribution Limit for 2021, Adjusts Other Benefit Limits

IRS Extends Deadline for Furnishing Form 1095-C to Employees, Extends Good-Faith Transition Relief for the Final Time

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has released Notice 2020-76, which extends the deadline for furnishing 2020 Forms 1095-B and 1095-C to individuals from January 31, 2021 to March 2, 2021.  The Notice also provides penalty relief for good-faith reporting errors and suspends the requirement to issue Form 1095-B to individuals, under certain conditions.

The due date for filing the forms with the IRS was not extended and remains March 1, 2021 (March 31, 2021 if filed electronically).

The regulations allow employers to request a 30-day extension to furnish statements to individuals by sending a letter to the IRS with certain information, including the reason for delay; however, because the Notice’s extension of time to furnish the forms is as generous as the 30-day extension contained in the instructions, the IRS will not formally respond to requests for an extension of time to furnish 2020 forms to individuals.  Employers may obtain an automatic 30-day extension for filing with the IRS by filing Form 8809 on or before the due date. An additional 30-day extension is available under certain hardship conditions. The Notice encourages employers who cannot meet the extended due dates to furnish and file as soon as possible and advises that the IRS will take such furnishing and filing into consideration when considering whether to abate penalties for reasonable cause.

Relief from Furnishing Form 1095-B to Individuals

Due to the individual mandate penalty being reduced to zero starting in 2019, an individual does not need the information on Form 1095-B in order to complete his or her federal tax return. Therefore, the IRS is granting penalty relief for employers who fail to furnish a Form 1095-B to individuals, provided that the reporting entity:

  • Posts a notice […]
By |October 7th, 2020|Compliance, Employee Benefits, Employee Benefits Adviser, Employee Communications, Human Resources, IRS, Legislation, Medical|Comments Off on IRS Extends Deadline for Furnishing Form 1095-C to Employees, Extends Good-Faith Transition Relief for the Final Time

IRS Releases Updated Form 720 Used For PCORI Fee Payments

IRS Releases Updated Form 720 Used For PCORI Fee Payments

As we recently reported, on June 8, 2020, the IRS released the applicable PCORI fee for plan years ending between October 1, 2019 and September 30, 2020.  As we indicated in that alert, an updated Form 720 had not yet been released and, therefore, employers were advised to wait to file their PCORI fees until the IRS released the updated form.  Late last week, the IRS issued the updated Form 720, which is the April 2020 Revised form. Employers who sponsored a self-funded health plan, including an HRA, with a plan year that ended in 2019 should use this updated Form 720 to pay the PCORI fee by the July 31, 2020 deadline.

As a reminder:

  • The insurance carrier is responsible for paying the PCORI fee on behalf of a fully insured plan.
  • The employer is responsible for paying the fee on behalf of a self-insured plan, including an HRA. In general, health FSAs are not subject to the PCORI fee.
  • Plans that ended between January 1, 2019 and September 30, 2019 use Form 720 to pay their PCORI fee of $2.45 per covered life.
  • Plans that ended between October 1, 2019 and December 31, 2019, use Form 720 to pay their PCORI fee of $2.54 per covered life.
By |June 18th, 2020|Compliance, Employee Benefits, Health Care Reform, IRS, Medical|Comments Off on IRS Releases Updated Form 720 Used For PCORI Fee Payments

PCORI Fees Due By July 31, 2020

Employers that sponsor self-insured group health plans, including health reimbursement arrangements (HRAs) should keep in mind the upcoming July 31, 2020 deadline for paying fees that fund the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI).  As background, the PCORI was established as part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to conduct research to evaluate the effectiveness of medical treatments, procedures and strategies that treat, manage, diagnose or prevent illness or injury.  Under the ACA, most employer sponsors and insurers were required to pay PCORI fees until 2019, as it only applied to plan years ending on or before September 30, 2019.  However, the PCORI fee was extended to plan years ending on or before September 30, 2029 as part of the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020.

The amount of PCORI fees due by employer sponsors and insurers is based upon the number of covered lives under each “applicable self-insured health plan” and “specified health insurance policy” (as defined by regulations) and the plan or policy year end date.  This year, employers will pay the fee for plan years ending in 2019.

For plan years that ended between January 1, 2019 and September 30, 2019, the fee is $2.45 per covered life and is due by July 31, 2020.

Since the extension of the PCORI fee deadline in December, issuers and sponsors of self-funded plans have been anxiously awaiting information from the IRS concerning the applicable PCORI fee for plans with plan years ending between October 1, 2019 and before October 1, 2020.  On June 8, 2020, the IRS Issued Notice 2020-44, which sets the applicable PCORI fee for these plans at $2.54 per covered life.  As of June 8, the IRS has not released the second quarter Form […]

By |June 10th, 2020|Employee Benefits, Health Care Reform, IRS, Legislation, Medical|Comments Off on PCORI Fees Due By July 31, 2020

IRS Releases 2021 HSA Contribution Limits and HDHP Deductible and Out-of-Pocket Limits

In Rev. Proc. 2020-32, the IRS released the inflation adjusted amounts for 2020 relevant to HSAs and high deductible health plans (HDHPs).  The table below summarizes those adjustments and other applicable limits.

  2021 2020 Change
Annual HSA Contribution Limit

(employer and employee)

Self-only: $3,600 Family: $7,200 Self-only: $3,550 Family: $7,100 Self-only: +$50 Family: +$100
HSA catch-up contributions

(age 55 or older)

$1,000 $1,000 No change
Minimum Annual HDHP Deductible Self-only: $1,400 Family: $2,800 Self-only: $1,400 Family: $2,800 No change
Maximum Out-of-Pocket for HDHP

(deductibles, co-payment & other amounts except premiums)

Self-only: $7,000 Family: $14,000 Self-only: $6,900 Family: $13,800 Self-only: +$100 Family: +$200

Out-of-Pocket Limits Applicable to Non-Grandfathered Plans

The ACA’s out-of-pocket limits for in-network essential health benefits have also been announced and have increased for 2021.

  2021 2020 Change
ACA Maximum Out-of-Pocket Self-only: $8,550

Family: $17,100

Self-only: $8,150

Family: $16,300

Self-only: +$400

Family: +$800

Note that all non-grandfathered group health plans must contain an embedded individual out-of-pocket limit within family coverage, if the family out-of-pocket limit is above $8,550 (2021 plan years) or $8,150 (2020 plan years). Exceptions to the ACA’s out-of-pocket limit rule are available for certain small group plans eligible for transition relief (referred to as “Grandmothered” plans).  A one-year extension of transition relief was announced on January 31, extending the transition relief to policy years beginning on or before October 1, 2021, provided that all policies end by December 31, 2022. (This transition relief has been extended each year since the initial announcement on November 14, 2013.)

Next Steps for Employers

As employers prepare for the 2021 plan year, they should keep in mind the following rules and ensure that any plan materials and participant communications reflect the new limits:

  • HDHPs cannot have an embedded […]
By |May 29th, 2020|Employee Benefits, Employee Benefits Adviser, Employee Communications, Human Resources, IRS, Legislation, Medical|Comments Off on IRS Releases 2021 HSA Contribution Limits and HDHP Deductible and Out-of-Pocket Limits