Disability

This is the Disability category of the Broad REach Benefits blog. At Broad Reach Benefits, we focus on employers that have between 30 and 500 benefit eligible employees. We’re employee benefit specialists, not a big box brokerage firm or payroll company with a sales force peddling policies.

The New York Paid Family Leave Law Became Effective January 1, 2018. Confused?

It keeps getting harder for even the most seasoned Human Resources team to stay on top of employee leaves.  Employers with 50 or more employees in New York need to comply with the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and the new New York Paid Family Leave (NYPFL).  Here are some key differences to consider: […]

By |February 15th, 2018|Compliance, Disability, Human Resources|Comments Off on The New York Paid Family Leave Law Became Effective January 1, 2018. Confused?

DOL Releases Proposed Rule Expanding Association Health Plans

Earlier this month, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) issued a proposed rule to expand the opportunity of unrelated employers of all sizes (but particularly small employers) to offer employment-based health insurance through Association Health Plans (AHPs). This rulemaking follows President Trump’s October 12, 2017 Executive Order 13813, “Promoting Healthcare Choice and Competition Across the United States,” which stated the Administration’s intention to prioritize the expansion of access to AHPs.

Overview

If adopted, the proposed rule would expand the definition of “employer” within the meaning of ERISA section 3(5) to broaden the criteria for determining when unrelated employers, including sole proprietors and self-employed individuals, may join together in a “bona fide group or association of employers” that is treated as the “employer” sponsor of a single multiple employer “employee welfare benefit plan” and “group health plan.”

By treating the association itself as the “employer” sponsor of a single plan, the regulation would facilitate the adoption and administration of such arrangements. The proposed rule does not appear to limit the size of employers who may participate in an AHP.

Significantly, the proposed rule would apply “large group” coverage rules under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to qualifying AHPs. AHPs that buy insurance would not be subject to the insurance “look-through” doctrine (i.e., the concept that the size of each individual employer participating in the association determines whether that employer’s coverage is subject to the small group market or the large group market rules). Instead, because an AHP would constitute a single plan, whether the plan would be buying insurance as a large or small group plan would be determined by reference to the number of employees in the entire AHP. This would offer a key advantage to […]

By |January 25th, 2018|Compliance, Disability, Employee Benefits, Employee Communications, Health Care Reform, Human Resources, Medical|Comments Off on DOL Releases Proposed Rule Expanding Association Health Plans

DOL Announces April 1 Applicability of Final Disability Plan Claims Procedure Regulations

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced its decision for April 1, 2018, as the applicability date for ERISA-covered employee benefit plans to comply with a final rule (released in December 2016) that imposes additional procedural protections (similar to those that apply to health plans) when dealing with claims for disability benefits. In October 2017, the DOL had announced a 90-day delay of the final rule, which was scheduled to apply to claims for disability benefits under ERISA-covered benefit plans that were filed on or after January 1, 2018.

Effective Date

While the DOL’s news release indicates that the DOL has decided on an April 1 applicability date for the final rule, the regulatory provision modified by the 90-day delay specified that the final rule will apply to claims filed “after April 1, 2018.”

Plans Subject to the Final Rule

The final rule applies to plans (either welfare or retirement) where the plan conditions the availability of disability benefits to the claimant upon a showing of disability. For example, if a claims adjudicator must make a determination of disability in order to decide a claim, the plan is subject to the final rule. Generally, this would include benefits under a long-term disability plan or a short-term disability plan to the extent that it is governed by ERISA.

However, the following short-term disability benefits are not subject to ERISA and, therefore, are not subject to the final rule:

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced its decision for April 1, 2018, as the applicability date for ERISA-covered employee benefit plans to comply with a final rule (released in December 2016) that imposes additional procedural protections (similar to those that apply to health plans) when dealing with […]

By |January 24th, 2018|Disability, Employee Benefits, Employee Communications, Human Resources, Legislation, Long Term Disability, Short Term Disability|Comments Off on DOL Announces April 1 Applicability of Final Disability Plan Claims Procedure Regulations

Massachusetts Releases Proposed Regulations on EMAC Supplement; HIRD Form Returns

On August 1, 2017, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker signed H.3822, which increases the existing Employer Medical Assistance Contribution (EMAC) and imposes an additional fee (EMAC Supplement) on employers with employees covered under MassHealth (Medicaid) or who receive subsidized coverage through ConnectorCare (certain plans offered through Massachusetts’ Marketplace). The increased EMAC and the EMAC Supplement are effective for 2018 and 2019 and are intended to sunset after 2019.

On November 6, 2017, the Massachusetts Department of Unemployment Assistance (DUA) released proposed regulations on the EMAC. Also on November 6, Governor Baker signed H.4008, which includes a provision that requires Massachusetts employers to submit a health insurance responsibility disclosure (HIRD) form annually.

The increased EMAC and the EMAC supplement are intended to be offset by a reduction in the increase of unemployment insurance rates in 2018 and 2019. The unemployment insurance relief is estimated to save employers $334 million over the next two years.

The EMAC itself is relatively new, having been created in 2014 after the repeal of Massachusetts’ “fair share” employer contribution. The EMAC applies to employers with six or more employees working in Massachusetts and applies regardless of whether the employer offers health coverage to its employees. Currently, the EMAC is .34% of wages up to $15,000, which caps out at $51 per employee per year. For 2018 and 2019, it will increase to .51%, or $77 per employee per year. In 2018, the EMAC and EMAC Supplement are expected to raise $75 million and $125 million in revenue, respectively.

Proposed Regulations on EMAC Supplement

The EMAC Supplement applies to employers with 6 or more employees in Massachusetts. Under the EMAC Supplement, employers must pay 5% of annual wages up to the annual wage cap […]

By |November 22nd, 2017|Disability, Employee Communications, Legislation, Medical, Private Health Care Exchange|Comments Off on Massachusetts Releases Proposed Regulations on EMAC Supplement; HIRD Form Returns

Legal Alert: Court Requires EEOC to Substantiate 30% Limit on Wellness Program Incentives

On August 22, 2017, a federal court in the District of Columbia ordered the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to reconsider the limits it placed on wellness program incentives under final regulations the agency issued last year under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA).  As part of the final regulations, the EEOC set a limit on incentives under wellness programs equal to 30% of the total cost of self-only coverage under the employer’s group health plan.  The court found that the EEOC did not properly consider whether the 30% limit on incentives would ensure the program remained “voluntary” as required by the ADA and GINA and sent the regulations back to the EEOC for reconsideration.

In the meantime, to avoid “potentially widespread disruption and confusion” the court decided that the final regulations would remain in place while the EEOC determines how it will proceed (e.g., provide support for its regulations, appeal the decision, or change the regulations). As background, under the ADA, wellness programs that involve a disability-related inquiry or a medical examination must be “voluntary.”  Similar requirements exist under GINA when there are requests for an employee’s family medical history (typically as part of a health risk assessment).  For years, the EEOC had declined to provide specific guidance on the level of incentive that may be provided under the ADA, and their informal guidance suggested that any incentive could render a program “involuntary.”  In 2016, after years of uncertainty on the issue, the agency released rules on wellness incentives that resemble, but do not mirror, the 30% limit established under U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) regulations applicable to health-contingent employer-sponsored wellness programs.  While the regulations appeared to be […]

By |September 11th, 2017|Compliance, Disability, Employee Benefits, Employee Communications, Health Care Reform, Legislation, Medical|Comments Off on Legal Alert: Court Requires EEOC to Substantiate 30% Limit on Wellness Program Incentives

Law Firms- Do you really Know What’s in Your Group Long Term Disability Contract?

Group Long Term Disability insurance (LTD) is intended to protect the income of the firms partners or directors, of counsel, attorneys and staff in the event they suffer an injury or illness.  It’s a very inexpensive benefit to purchase yet arguably one of the most important.  Group LTD can ultimately cover millions of dollars of potential loss in the event of a permanent disability.  Many law firms fail to realize that subtle features and provisions within their group policy can dramatically increase or decrease the payout for a claim until a claim unfortunately occurs.

Through our years of experience working with the legal profession we’ve developed a systematic approach to providing specialized coverage for law firms.  As part of the Broad Reach Benefits process, our team provides you with a group LTD plan audit.  By providing us with a copy of your current LTD summary plan description and answering a few questions we can produce a detailed assessment of any potential areas of weakness in your current LTD contract.  Since each insurance carrier can provide varying levels of contracts it is critical to understand what and how your contract provides protection. Most benefit brokers provide a simple spreadsheet comparison that takes an executive summary view of the benefits and compares prices.  This approach will not show the “under the hood” provisions and clauses that will have a dramatic impact on benefit payouts in the event of a claim.

Below are a few questions to consider when thinking about your current group LTD policy: […]

By |March 3rd, 2014|Disability, Employee Benefits, Law Firms, Long Term Disability|Comments Off on Law Firms- Do you really Know What’s in Your Group Long Term Disability Contract?

New Jersey TDB Changes for 2013- State or Private Coverage?

Employers in New Jersey are required to provide short term disability known as Temporary Disability Benefits or TDB.  Employers covered by the Unemployment Compensation Law are also subject to the Temporary Disability Benefits (TDB) Law, with a few exceptions.  While employers must provide TDB coverage they can secure this coverage directly from the State of New Jersey or from a private carrier.

Back in 2012 the State of New Jersey lowered the employee rate for TDB coverage from .50% to .20% of taxable wages effectively calling this a tax decrease.  Since this decrease was not viable from an actuarial standpoint the State of NJ has now increased (shocker..) the employee rate to .36% of taxable wages for 2013.  The annual taxable wage base did increase from $30,300 in 2012 to $30,900 in 2013.

Because the state rates have once again increased, employers should carefully evaluate whether getting coverage through the state or from a private carrier is more cost effective.

By |January 23rd, 2013|Disability|Comments Off on New Jersey TDB Changes for 2013- State or Private Coverage?

Long Term Disability- The Zero Day Residual Benefit

Does your long term disability contract require total disability in order for the qualifying period to start?  Better make 100% certain that is NOT the case and someone wasn’t asleep at the switch when your contract was written.  Your plan should include a zero day residual benefit.

Zero day residual provides coverage for partial disabilities in the qualifying period of a claim.  This means a claimant can use partial days of work to satisfy the qualifying period for both short term and long term disability.  Without a zero day residual benefit an employee would have to be totally disabled in order for their 90 or 180 day qualifying period to start.  Think about it.  How many people are not totally disabled on day one of a claim?  An employee who develops cancer (a leading cause of LTD claims) may start out being partially disabled, unable to perform at 100%, but not totally disabled.  In contracts without a zero day residual feature that partially disabled employee wouldn’t even be able to get their 90 or 180 day clock ticking and certainly wouldn’t receive a benefit.

In an attempt to reduce costs, some carriers and employee benefits brokers may strip out features.  Don’t wait to get burned on a claim to find out what your benefits include.

By |August 6th, 2012|Disability, Employee Benefits, Long Term Disability, Short Term Disability|Comments Off on Long Term Disability- The Zero Day Residual Benefit

Retirement Plan Contribution Protection

So, a key employee becomes disabled and luckily you have a great group Long Term Disability Plan and an Individual Disability Plan on top to provide the employee with the needed income while they are laid up.  But what about their retirement plan?  While they are out on total disability there are no contributions going in to fund their retirement.

Retirement Plan Contribution Protection allows employers to offer their employees a unique benefit that helps protect their retirement plan contributions in the event of a total disability. […]
By |July 6th, 2012|Disability|Comments Off on Retirement Plan Contribution Protection